MiCO: Migratory Connectivity in the Ocean
  • New Study on Connectivity

    MiCO researchers release a new study on connectivity, with 71 authors led by Daniel Dunn (MGEL/UQ) and Autumn-Lynn Harrison (Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center).

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  • What is migratory connectivity?

    Until recently, our understanding of patterns between migratory species and their interconnectivity in the world’s oceans was limited. As this migratory connectivity comes into focus, so does its ability to influence international policy and conservation efforts.

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  • The MiCO System

    On April 1st, 2019 the MiCO System launches at the 2nd Intergovernmental Conference on the Conservation and Sustainable Use of Marine Biological Diversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (BBNJ).

    Learn more and explore the system

  • Management implications

    Connecting the national jurisdictions of 30+ countries across four continents and the high seas, Cory’s shearwaters encounter numerous threats from human activities during their migratory movements, presenting a complex management challenge.

    Cory's Shearwater

  • Case Studies

    Events in one location can impact distant locations, as a result of connectivity created by migratory species. Our case studies on Western Indian Ocean green sea turtles, Cory's shearwater and Laysan albatross examine stressors and impacts to migration.

    Read our Case Studies

About The Project

MiCO, Migratory Connectivity in the Ocean, is developing a system that aggregates and generates actionable knowledge to support worldwide conservation efforts for numerous migratory species and the oceans on which they depend.

What is MiCO?  Who is it for?  How can it help me?

Launch System

MiCO is a Consortium

This project is a collective effort between the Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab (MGEL) of Duke University and a growing number of international partner organizations.

Consortium Partners

Consortium Data Contributors

MiCO is guided by a steering committee with three advisory panels:

Project Structure

 

Become a Data Partner

The success of MiCO, and its ability to influence conservation outcomes, depends on our network of data holders. Learn more about how your data can further the project.

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MiCO Species

A wide variety of migratory species—including marine turtle, marine mammal, seabird, and fish—are the focus of the MiCO project’s data collection and aggregation.

See the full list